Inclusive Practices in Early Childhood Programs

Updated May 12, 2014

The following links may be of interest as you search the world wide web for information on inclusive child care and other related topics. Many of the sites listed below are good starting points for additional links. The descriptions come from the sites themselves and are not offered with any official Map to Inclusive Child Care or WestEd endorsement.*
 

A - C

AblePlay™ External website will open in new window

AblePlay™ is a toy rating system and website that provides comprehensive information on toys for children with special needs so parents, special educators, therapist and others can make the best choices for the children in their lives with disabilities. Developed by the National Lekotek Center, a nonprofit authority on play for children with disabilities, AblePlay™ will provide parents, and the professionals who work with them, access to the most useful, product-specific information about the top play and learning products and toys for children with disabilities.

Phone: 773-276-5164

Administration for Children and Families US Department of Health and Human Services

Birth to 5: Help Me Thrive Initiative of the US Department of Health and Human Services External website will open in new window
This initiative draws heavily on previous developmental and behavioral screening efforts by consolidating materials from a wide array of federal agencies and their non-federal partners. As part of this initiative, they have published a compendium of research-based developmental screening tools appropriate for use across a wide range of settings and tailored guides for use with the screening tools geared toward nine different audiences including early care and education providers, early intervention providers, home visitors and families. The guides address the importance of developmental and behavioral screening, how to talk to parents, where to go for help, and how to select the most appropriate screening tool for the population served as well as the provider implementing the screening.

Tips for Early Care and Education Providers: Simple Concepts to Embed in Everyday Routines Adobe PDF File External website will open in new window
Researchers from around the country offer helpful tips that you can practice to help the young children in your care grow and learn. The tips are based on concepts of learning and development that can be worked into everyday routines. Each tip describes a concept, why the concept is important, and a step-by-step description of how to put the concept into action. We hope these concepts are useful in supporting all the children in your care.

Autism Awareness and Acceptance in Early Childhood Education Resource contains video External website will open in new window
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affects about 1 in 68 children in the U.S. (CDC, 2014), with more children being identified than ever before. The early childhood community has a unique opportunity to touch the lives of these children and their families in ways that can make a real difference.

All Children Are Special: How to Know When a Child Needs Help PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

A Manual for Parents and Child Care Providers by the Children’s Inclusive Care Council of Amador and Calaveras Counties.

Children's Inclusive Care Council of Amador and Calaveras. (2006)

An Administrator's Guide to Preschool Inclusion PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

This guide is for administrators who are responsible for setting up, monitoring, supporting, and maintaining inclusive programs for preschool children. Topics include: quality, collaboration, staff development, costs and financing, family-centered inclusion, and systems change.

Wolery, R.A., & Odom, S.L. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina, FPG Child Development Institute. (2000)

Blended Practices for Teaching Young Children in Inclusive Settings External website will open in new window

Bridging the gap between special and general education, Blended Practices for Teaching Young Children in Inclusive Settings integrates knowledge about effective practices for teaching young children with and without disabilities into one comprehensive approach, giving teachers the explicit guidance. Early childhood teachers will use this as a reference for years to come as they blend best practices from special and general education, develop effective curricula for inclusive classrooms, and improve outcomes for all children.

Grisham-Brown, J., Hemmeter, M.L., & Pretti-Frontczak, K. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. (2005)

Bridges Newsletter External website will open in new window

Each newsletter release offers the reader articles on a variety of topics of interest to teachers and administrators of early care and education programs.

Published by the California Department of Education.

Click here for the Summer 2005 PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required issue for information and contacts for the Early Intervention and Early Childhood Education System in California.

Building Blocks for Teaching Preschoolers with Special Needs External website will open in new window

This easy-to-use guidebook offers strategies for teaching children with special needs in an inclusive classroom, tailoring activities to individual needs, and working on a child’s IEP goals. At the heart of the book is the authors’ Building Blocks model, three practical methods teachers can use to include young children with disabilities in the classroom: curriculum modifications that allow all children to participate, embedded learning opportunities that are used within typical classroom activities, and child-focused instructional strategies that help children achieve individual learning objectives.

Sandall, S.R., & Schwartz, I.S. Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes. (2002)

Building an Inclusive “Preschool for All” Program PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

Child Care Law Center. San Francisco, CA: (2004)

Building Inclusive Child Care (BICC) Universal Design for Learning Video Resource opens in a new window

ALTTEXTInclusive child care seeks the full integration of children with disabilities into the child care and pre-school setting. Accomplishing this goal requires the use of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles as well as working closely with families. The BICC Universal Design for Learning video and accompanying checklist is funded by the Pennsylvania Developmental Disabilities Council and administered by Northampton Community College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

California Parent Organizations - Quality Assurance Process (CA Dept of Education) External website will open in new window

This website contains a list of California agencies providing resources for families of children with disabilities.

CARA‘S KIT Creating Adaptations for Routines and Activities PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

Milbourne, S. A., & Campbell, P.H., Philadelphia, PA: Child and Family Research Programs, Thomas Jefferson University. (2007).

Case Method of Instruction Outreach Project External website will open in new window

CMI is an instructional strategy that provides students / participants with opportunities to employ theory, facts and specific skills in problem-solving and decision-making applications based on real-life situations. This site offers many features, including information on how to use CMI in teaching and training cases that illustrate dilemmas related to inclusion and natural environments.

Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) External website will open in new window

CELL videos are designed for the teacher, parent, trainer, coach and home visitor. Each video introduces and illustrates a key component of the CELL Early Literacy Learning Model. The home visitor may use a video to introduce and illustrate a component with a parent. The trainer may use a video to introduce, illustrate or practice a component with teachers. The videos are for use by Teachers and with Parents as indicated.

Center for Inclusive Child Care (CICC) External website will open in new window

The mission of the Center for Inclusive Child Care is to create, promote and support pathways to successful inclusive care for all children. The project is a comprehensive resource network for promoting and supporting inclusive early childhood and school-age programs and providers. We provide leadership, administrative support, training, and consultation to early care and education providers, school-age care providers, parents, and the professionals who support providers and parents of children with special needs. The Center for Inclusive Child care envisions weaving the common threads of knowledge, respect and sensitivity to create and sustain opportunities for high quality, culturally responsive inclusive care in which children and their families are supported and nurtured.

  • Downloadable Inclusion Documents External website will open in new window
  • Inclusion Matters Audio Icon External website will open in new window
    Inclusion Matters is a new product of CICC in the form of podcasts about 10 minutes each on the full range of inclusion topics in an engaging, easy to listen to format. Podcasts are available for listening on the website and for download on itunes. CEU's are available for podcasts.

Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) External website will open in new window

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning is a national center focused on strengthening the capacity of child care and Head Start programs to improve the social and emotional outcomes of young children.

Child Care Plus+ External website will open in new window

The Center on Inclusion in Early Childhood is dedicated to sharing knowledge, fostering skills, and encouraging attitudes that promote inclusion as a core component of excellence in early childhood. The website offers a variety of products, informational newsletters and links to help teach individuals more about inclusion. The organization conducts a variety of trainings and studies, all of which are described on the website.

ConnectAbility External website will open in new window

ConnectAbility is a Canadian website and virtual community dedicated to lifelong learning and support for people who have an intellectual disability, their families and support networks. The core of our community is accessible, self-directed access to valuable information and tools, ready on demand. Unique features include “Tip Sheets,” “Workshops” and “Radio Shows.”

Connect Modules External website will open in new window

From Frank Porter Graham at the University of North Carolina the Connect Modules provide training on practices to solve dilemmas in early childhood settings with videos, activities and narratives to guide you through a process to learn about serving children with disabilities effectively.

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D - F

DEC Recommended Practices: A Comprehensive Guide for Practical Application in Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education External website will open in new window

Birth-5: This guide contains all the helpful information found in the original DEC Recommended Practices, plus real life examples and practical tips for implementation. This wonderful book includes strategies for program assessment and improvement, useful checklists for parents and administrators, and an annotated list of relevant resources.

Sandall, Hemmeter, Smith and McLean

Disability is Natural External website will open in new window

The mission of this site is to encourage new ways of thinking about developmental disabilities, in the belief that changes in our attitudes and actions can help create a society where all children and adults with developmental disabilities have opportunities to live the lives of their dreams, included in all areas of life.

The Disability Social History Project External website will open in new window

People with disabilities have an exciting and rich history that should be shared with the world. This website is dedicated to sharing this history. Features include a timeline of disability history, a list of famous people with disabilities, bibliographies of specific disability areas, and a section of website links.

The DRM Regional Resource Directory: California External website will open in new window

This site has an extensive list of links to nonprofit organizations and government agencies serving people with disabilities in California.

Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center (ECLKC) External website will open in new window
A service of the Office of Head Start

The Head Start National Center on Quality Teaching and Learning will identify, develop, and promote teaching and learning practices with a strong evidence base to help Head Start programs achieve the best possible outcomes for young children. The Center will develop products, deliver professional development opportunities, and work closely with Head Start training and technical assistance providers to ensure that effective educational strategies become everyday practices. This section focuses on resources to support children with disabilities.

Everyday Children's Learning Opportunities Institute External website will open in new window

Information included on the website includes a broad range of topics on young children's everyday learning opportunities and natural learning environments. Website content is based on more than 15 years of research and practice on the characteristics and consequences of everyday learning of children from birth to six years of age. Several bibliographies related to natural learning environments are also available to download from the website.

Early Intervention Strategies for Success Resource opens in a new window

Series of 5 photographs of an infant taking their first stepsEarly Intervention Strategies for Success is a blog produced by the Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center. It offers practical articles and discussions about implementing early intervention supports and strategies. Tips and strategies useful when working with families of infants and toddlers with special needs within the context of their everyday routines are provided along with best practices, follow-up from professional development activities, and other topics relevant to early interventionists in Virginia. The strategies are relevant to home visitors and early interventionists from any state.

Experience the Possibilities External website will open in new window

The Possibilities project provides parents and practitioners with the tools to identify their children's special interests and assets, to match them to exciting resources and opportunities in their child's home and community, and to promote participation in those activities. The project’s website provides background information about the study, reference materials, related products, and links to other resources.

Family & Child Transitions Into Least Restrictive Environments External website will open in new window

Key resources offered on this website include an extensive discussion of how service providers and family members can ease the transitions of young children who have special needs as they enter preschool, facilitating inclusion in preschool settings, planning school transitions, and writing interagency agreements on transition.

Family Guided Approaches to Early Intervention Training and Services (FACETS) External website will open in new window

The FACETS project provides training for family-guided, activity based intervention strategies. The website offers a description of the project and training, family stories, and internet resources.

Family Village School External website will open in new window

The Family Village is a global community that integrates information, resources and communication opportunities on the Internet for persons with cognitive and other disabilities, for their families and for those that provide them services. The community includes informational resources on specific diagnoses, communication connections, adaptive products and technology, adaptive recreational activities, education, health issues, disability-related media and literature, and much more.

Friendship Circle External website will open in new window

Circular logo that reads The Friendship CircleFriendship Circle of Michigan is a non-profit organization that provides programs and support to the families of individuals with special needs. With over 75,000 visitors a month, the Friendship Circle Special Needs Resource blog is one of the biggest special needs blogs in the world. Currently the blog has over 500 articles on special needs topics including: parenting, special education, products, therapy tips, videos and more.

G - I

Head Start Inclusion External website will open in new window

Funded by the Office of Head Start, the overarching goal is to increase the competence, confidence, and effectiveness of personnel in Head Start programs to include children with disabilities. Look here for training materials, self study tutorials, video glossary, research briefs, tools for teachers and coordinators, as well as other resources.

IDEA Law and Practices External website will open in new window

The Council for Exceptional Children provides up to date information about IDEA. Information about the specifics of the law is provided. The website discusses many other issues relevant to children with disabilities.

Including All Children External website will open in new window

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC External website will open in new window).

Inclusion.com External website will open in new window

10 Reasons for Inclusive Schools (Poster)

TheInclusiveClass.com External website will open in new window

Circular logo that reads The Friendship CircleFrom defining inclusion to discussing the ethics of inclusion to offering a variety of print, video, and web resources, this site provides a nice introduction to inclusion.

Institute for Community Inclusion External website will open in new window

ICI is committed to developing resources and supports for people with disabilities and their families, fostering interdependence, productivity, and inclusion in school and community settings. To achieve that goal, the organization’s website offers an impressive array of online publications crucial for individuals with disabilities to understand including those related to transition planning, families, health care, employment, policy. The website also provides an extensive listing of links to other websites of interest to individuals with disabilities.

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J - L

Kids Included Together (KIT) External website will open in new window

Kids Included Together (KIT) was founded in 1997. Its mission is to support recreational, child development, and youth development programs that include children with and without disabilities. KIT's goals are to enrich the lives of all who participate and to increase understanding and acceptance of disabilities as a natural part of life.

Now debuting free eLearning demos Inclusion is Belonging and Introduction to Inclusion! Click below to experience NTCI's self-paced eLearning. NTCI’s eLearning program will soon include ALL of the following self-paced modules:

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M - O

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) External website will open in new window

The NAEYC External website will open in new window website provides information for teachers, faculty, parents, and students on a variety of issues related to early childhood education. Position statements on a multitude of topics including inclusion, standards, and curriculum are also available.

National Inclusion Project External website will open in new window

Through innovative programs and strategic partnerships, we are leading the way for inclusive communities nationwide. "Let's ALL Play" provides a program model for recreational programs seeking to improve the way they implement inclusion. "Together We're Better" is an effective service learning curriculum tool that teachers and program providers can use to help all children make an impact. We also offer other grants for those seeking to make a difference in their communities with inclusive programs and families seeking to benefit from inclusive programs.

National Information Center for Children and Youth With Disabilities (NICHCY) External website will open in new window

NICHCY is very pleased to offer you a wealth of information on disabilities! NICHCY stands for the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities. We serve the nation as a central source of information on: disabilities in infants, toddlers, children, and youth; IDEA, which is the law authorizing special education; No Child Left Behind (as it relates to children with disabilities), and research-based information on effective educational practices.

National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) External website will open in new window

  • Early Childhood Inclusion External website will open in new window
    Two major early childhood organizations, DEC and NAEYC, created a joint definition and position statement on early childhood inclusion through a process facilitated by the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI). Return here often to discover new resources and examples for using these resources to improve early childhood services.
  • Foundations of Transition Video Content includes Video External website will open in new window
    Today, most families of young children use and move between different types of early childhood services -- like Head Start, private child care, public preschool, or kindergarten. Moving between and among these various programs is often referred to as ’transition’.” This 8-minute video provides an overview of the desirable outcomes of transition, research identifying effective transition practices, as well as the legal requirements of early childhood transition (running time: 8 min. 19 sec.)
  • Speaking of Inclusion (Blog from fpg) External website will open in new window
    Inclusion insights, stories and resources for professional development providers as well as practitioners, policy makers and parents. An informative blog brought to you by the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion. Your comments are invited.
  • Response to Intervention in Early Childhood (RTI-EC) External website will open in new window
    The NPCDI facilitated a process with The Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children (DEC), the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), and the National Head Start Association (NHSA) to create a reliable source of information on the emerging practice of Response to Intervention in Early Childhood.
  • Quality Inclusive Practices: Resources and Landing Pads External website will open in new window
    Provides brief descriptions and supporting references for evidence-based and promising practices that support early childhood inclusion.
  • Building Inclusive Child Care (North Hampton Community College) Content includes Video External website will open in new window
    Universal Design for Learning Video

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P - S

People First Language PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

That old "sticks and stones" saying is wrong: words are powerful and they can hurt! Other civil rights movements generated changes toward more respectful and accurate language and attitudes; the Disability Rights Movement is doing the same, beginning with People First Language. (This is the 4-page version, with examples.)

Snow, Kathie. www.disabilityisnatural.com External website will open in new window (2009)

Position Statement on Inclusion External website will open in new window

DEC and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) developed a joint position statement on early childhood inclusion (April 2009).

Division for Early Childhood (DEC).

Power of the Ordinary External website will open in new window

This website is a celebration of the rich array of powerful learning opportunities occurring throughout the everyday lives of children ages birth to six. Whether you want to view the slide show of children's everyday natural learning environments, look for ideas to make each day filled with learning, inform families about everyday learning opportunities, or brush up on research, this website has something for everyone.

Preschool Options Project External website will open in new window

The Preschool Options Project is a DPI-funded project that provides information to assist school districts in developing a range of options in Least Restrictive Environments (LRE) for young children with disabilities. Its website provides ideas, tools, and resources.

Project Support: Supporting Early Childhood Inclusion External website will open in new window

Project Support includes both inservice and preservice materials, and provides information and strategies appropriate to both itinerant consultation and co-teaching models of inclusion support. Materials include a guide to implementing a field-tested three-phase inservice model for training inclusion support providers.

Quality Indicators of Inclusive Programs/Practices: A Compilation of Selected Resources PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

Available resources and indicators of high quality inclusive practices are presented in this compilation. Assembling many different resources in one place allows for easy comparison of potential indicators of quality. Excerpts and adaptations of the resources are intended to provide some familiarity with the content of each resource and encourage further examination via links to more complete information. National and state-developed resources contained within this document have been designed for a variety of audiences, and may be useful for families, practitioners, program administrators, technical assistance personnel, researchers, and state administrators. From NECTAC Publications External website will open in new window, (2010), 34pp.

Cate, D., Diefendorf, M., McCullough, K., Peters, M., & Whaley, K.

Research and Training Center on Early Childhood Development External website will open in new window

This web site is designed specifically for parents, therapists, early childhood educators, early interventionists, and researchers. It includes information about effective early childhood intervention practices based on research. This information will improve interventions associated with the healthy mental, behavioral, communication, preliteracy, social-emotional, and interpersonal development of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with or at risk for developmental disabilities.

Response to Intervention in Early Childhood External website will open in new window

In a matter of a few short years, RTI has become a familiar phrase in the early childhood field. Because RTI is an emerging practice, it is critical that the early childhood field has a reliable source of information as programs begin to define and implement these practices. Three national organizations are working to provide this guidance. The Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children (DEC), the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), and the National Head Start Association (NHSA) are working together to develop a joint position statement on RTI in early childhood. The National Professional Development Center on Inclusion (NPDCI) is helping to facilitate the process.

Selected Resources on Financing Early Childhood Systems to Support Inclusive Options for Young Children with Disabilities PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

Whaley, Goode and deFosset

Setting the Pace: Model Inclusive Child Care Centers Serving Families of Children with Emotional or Behavioral Challenges External website will open in new window

This report by a research team at Portland State University (Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health) is the results of a national study of nine child care centers, selected for their success in serving families of children with emotional or behavioral challenges. The study is based on more than 90 interviews with parents, directors and staff. Parents of children, with and without challenges, talk about their experiences of inclusive childcare. Directors and staff share the successful practices they have developed, their challenges, and the lessons they have learned about how to provide childcare for this group of families. In the final section of the report, the research team discusses ways to promote inclusion, and provide information on additional resources. An executive summary, individual chapters and resource lists may also be downloaded at this site.

Brennan, E., Bradley, J., Ama, S., and Cawood, N. Portland, OR: Portland State University, Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health. (2003).

Download the PDF version of 'Setting the Pace: Model Inclusive Child Care Centers Serving Families of Children with Emotional or Behavioral Challenges' PDF: Adobe Acrobat Required.

Sibling Support Project External website will open in new window
Don Meyer University of Washington

The Sibling Support Project is a national effort dedicated to the life-long concerns of brothers and sisters of people who have special health, developmental, or mental health concerns.

Special Education Resources on the Internet (SERI) External website will open in new window

SERI is a collection of Internet accessible information resources of interest to those involved in the fields related to Special Education. This collection exists in order to make on-line Special Education resources more easily and readily available in one location. One entire section of the website focuses on inclusion.

SpecialLink External website will open in new window

SpecialLink puts researchers, policy makers, parents, early childhood educators and directors in touch with the best inclusive practices on the frontlines of Canadian child care. SpeciaLink's goal is to expand the quality and quantity of opportunities for inclusion in child care, recreation, education, and other community settings, to young children with special needs and their families. Our findings are available to EVERYONE.

The SpeciaLink Child Care Inclusion Practices Profile and Principles Scale are tools for assessing inclusion quality in child care centres. Used together, they provide a picture of sustainable and evolving inclusion quality — an emerging issue as more children with special needs attend community-based centres and as inclusion pioneers leave their centres and a new generation of directors and early childhood educators take on the challenge. These documents are available by request and are distributed at most of our training. SpeciaLink appreciates the financial support of the Canadian Council on Learning as we refine the instruments to meet standards for high quality research.

  • The SpeciaLink Child Care Inclusion Principles and the SpeciaLink Child Care Inclusion Profile are available upon request.
  • Specialink Child Care Inclusion Principles and the Specialink Child Care Inclusion Profile are used in conjunction with the Environmental Rating Scales External website will open in new window

SpecialQuest External website will open in new window
Multimedia Training Library: Supporting Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities and their Families in Inclusive Settings.

These training materials focus on providing services to infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families in early care and education programs, in partnership with early intervention. The materials include facilitator guides, training scripts, videos in English and Spanish, handouts, and a CD-ROM with supporting materials in English and Spanish. These training materials are designed to be used by early childhood educators, families, child care and service providers, inclusion specialists, early interventionists, and college and university professors.

SpecialQuest Birth–Five: Head Start/Hilton Training Program, a special project of Napa County Office of Education.

Spotting My Child’s Very Special Interests: A Guide for Parents. External website will open in new window

This short video is designed to accompany Spotting My Child's Very Special Interests: A Workbook for Parents, an easy-to-use workbook that takes parents step-by-step from interest identification through planning participation in terrific activities. The video illustrates how a mother uses the workbook to plan interest-based learning for her young daughter.

Asheville, NC: Winterberry Press. Orlena Hawks Puckett Institute. (2004).

Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN) External website will open in new window

The mission of the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network of New Jersey is to empower families and inform and involve professionals and other individuals interested in the healthy development and educational rights of children. Numerous articles available in The Bridge Archives on this website.

Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Settings (SPIES): A Video-assisted Program for Educators and Families. External website will open in new window

The SPIES curriculum is designed to introduce intervention strategies that can be used with children who have disabilities, special health needs, or are at risk for the development of a disability. Using everyday settings as the context for intervention, these very thorough materials introduce strategies that can be used to help children master IEP or IFSP objectives. While the primary age range targeted is preschool (3–5), there is also content specific to infants and toddlers (0–2). The curriculum is divided into six modules (Creating Teaching Opportunities, Providing Help, Incidental Teaching, Tracking Progress, Prior to Preschool, and Planning Intervention across the Day), each of which includes facilitator materials, participant materials (handouts) and a companion videotape. A CD-ROM version is also available.

Rule, S., & Lancelot, B. Center for Persons with Disabilities, Logan, UT: Utah State University.

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T - V

TASH External website will open in new window

TASH supports the inclusion and full participation of children and adults with disabilities in all aspects of their communities as determined by personalized visions of quality of life.

10 Keys to Successful Inclusion PDF, Adobe Acrobat Required

A brief by Gary Bunch.

This brief paper focuses on 10 keys to inclusion and success based on my experiences in Canada. All of Canada, by no means, has embraced inclusive education wholly and warmly. The traditional special education model is the model of choice across most of the land, particularly for educators and governments.

Therapists as Collaborative Team Members for Infants/Toddler Community Services External website will open in new window

One of the key features of this website is a preview of a series of training modules that individuals can choose to partake in. These modules cover routines based assessment in natural environments, linking assessment to intervention through team planning, using daily routines as a context for intervention, and involving the care provider in teaching/learning. The website also includes a newsletter, family stories, and internet resources.

Think Inclusive Blog External website will open in new window

Five Secrets to Being a Special Education Teacher and Still Love Your Job

A Thinking Guide to Inclusive Childcare External website will open in new window
[Click for ordering and downloading information.]

This Thinking Guide offers ideas and strategies to support staff in developing childcare practices that consider the needs of individual children and promote an inclusive experience for the families and children in your care. Your program can operate as “a thinking organization” by learning to ask the kinds of questions that lead to creative solutions for the education, support and inclusion of young children with a wide range of abilities. This guide does not try to tell you what to do for a child with a specific disability. Instead, you will learn how to engage staff and families in conversations that can help you respond to challenges as they arise.

Sweet, M. Disability Rights Wisconsin. (February 2008).

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W - Z (None available at this time)

Washington Learning Systems External website will open in new window

Washington Learning Systems is offering free language and early literacy activities, developed by Angela Notari-Syverson and Judy Challoner, with illustrations by Don Syverson (available in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Mandarin, Somali, Burmese and Russian). The materials include home and community activities for adults and young children (birth-5) that encourage early language and literacy development. They are appropriate for children with disabilities, as well as children who are developing typically. To download the materials go from the site, click on "Literacy Resources." You will need to create an account using your email address and a password.

The development of these materials was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs and by funding from Washington Learning Systems. They may be copied and distributed freely, as long as they are not sold.

  • On the Go Resources External website will open in new window - Available in English, Spanish, Somali, Russian, Vietnamese, Mandarin and Burmese
    The "On the Go" materials include 14 activities designed to be used outside the home: in the car, while walking, during bus rides, etc. The activities encourage early language and literacy development from birth through preschool. They are appropriate for children with disabilities as well as children who are developing typically. The materials are designed to encourage parents to interact with their children while they are "On the Go" to facilitate language, early literacy, and positive parent-child interactions. The 14 activities are accompanied by hints for each of the activities about how to modify them to meet the specific developmental needs of the child. Each activity fits on a half-sheet of paper, so it can be easily provided to parents as a take-home.

What's Best for Infants and Young Children? External website will open in new window

Brault and Chasen

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* Map to Inclusive Child Care and WestEd do NOT endorse or assume any responsibility for information found on these sites. The following links are provided as a source of information and resources. Please e-mail us information about other sites that will add depth and knowledge to these listings.