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Cultural Competency & Resources in Multiple Languages

Teacher assisting students with an art project during classIn response to requests from the field for resources to support culturally competent work with children and families as well as easy access to resources in multiple languages, additional web resources have been identified and collected below.

The following links may be of interest as you search the world wide web for information on inclusive child care and other related topics. Many of the sites listed below are good starting points for additional links. The descriptions come from the sites themselves and are not offered with any official Map to Inclusive Child Care or WestEd endorsement.



Cultural Competency



California Tomorrow

California Tomorrow’s mission is to help create a just and inclusive multiracial, multicultural and multilingual society by promoting equal access to social, economic and educational resources and equal participation in major institutions, and by embracing diversity as a great strength.

Since 1984, we have specialized in the development of new models and strategies to bring about inclusion and equity. California Tomorrow works directly with people in public schools, community-building organizations, family-serving institutions, after school and early childhood programs, community colleges, and private philanthropy to build the capacity of their institutions to effectively serve all communities. We collect and interpret demographic data in relation to social justice. And we engage in advocacy aimed at furthering equity, challenging exclusion, and promoting policies that build upon the assets of our society’s diversity.


Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ECMHC)

The Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (CECMHC) was funded as an Innovation and Improvement Project by the Office of Head Start in October 2008. The 3-year grant brings together a group of university researchers to develop strategies to help Head Start programs build a strong mental health foundation for their children, families and staff. The site houses resources for Head Start mental health consultants, staff, families, administrators and T&TA Providers.


Child Trends: Hispanic Institute

Child Trends Hispanic Institute provides timely and insightful research-based information and guidance to improve outcomes for Latino children. A fast-growing and diverse segment of the U.S. population, Latino’s now represent 16 percent of our nation’s population and 25 percent of children.

We provide policymakers, practitioners, the media, corporate leaders, and private philanthropy with knowledge about Latino children, youth and families in the U.S. to help inform decision making. We do this by providing statistical portraits of Hispanic children and youth, expanding the evidence base  by developing and conducting evaluations of programs aimed at Latinos, and building the data infrastructure on Hispanic children and youth. Site includes a wealth of publication on various topics around Hispanic children.


Colorín Colorado

Colorín Colorado is a free web-based service that provides information, activities and advice for educators and Spanish-speaking families of English language learners (ELLs). Colorín Colorado is an educational initiative of WETA, the flagship public television and radio station in the nation’s capital. Major funding comes from the American Federation of Teachers, with additional support from the National Institute for Literacy and the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs.


Culturally & Linguistically Appropriate Services Early Childhood Research Institute (CLAS)

The CLAS Institute identifies, evaluates, and promotes effective and appropriate early intervention practices and preschool practices that are sensitive and respectful to children and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

The CLAS Institute identifies, collects, reviews, catalogs, abstracts, and describes materials and practices developed for children and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and professionals who work with them.



Enabling Education Network (EENET)

EENET is an information-sharing network on the issue of inclusive education. Our network is open to everyone. We share information originating in countries of the South and encourage conversations and debates about inclusion and rights in education.


Family Partnerships and Culture (PDF)

Published: 2016 | Size: 9MB
This California Department of Education publication aims to assist early childhood professionals in the development of cultural competence in working with children and families from diverse cultural backgrounds. Specifically, the aims of the publication are to help programs to value families and their contribution to children’s learning; approach cultural diversity with an open mind; apply knowledge gained about families, including their values and beliefs, to teaching and learning.


Fiesta Educativa, Inc.

Fiesta Educativa was founded in California in 1978 to inform and assist Latino families in obtaining services and in caring for their children with special needs. Fiesta Educativa was formed by family members and professionals who recognized the need to provide assistance and advocacy to these Spanish-speaking families.


Harvard Family Research Project

The Harvard Family Research Project has helped stakeholders develop and evaluate strategies to promote the well being of children, youth, families, and their communities. They work primarily within three areas that support children’s learning and development—early childhood education, out-of-school time programming, and family and community support in education. Underpinning all of their work is a commitment to evaluation for strategic decision making, learning, and accountability. Below are some useful publications and links to areas on the Harvard Family Research Project that are directly related to family engagement.


Head Start Early Childhood Learning & Knowledge Center (ECLKC): Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness

The Head Start National Center on Quality Teaching and Learning will identify, develop, and promote teaching and learning practices with a strong evidence base to help Head Start programs achieve the best possible outcomes for young children. The Center will develop products, deliver professional development opportunities, and work closely with Head Start training and technical assistance providers to ensure that effective educational strategies become everyday practices. This section focuses on resources to support children with disabilities.


Improving Access and Opportunity for Latinos in Early Childhood

What are the elements of a quality education for young Latino children and their teachers that is culturally and linguistically responsive to their needs? The Center for Children & Families conducted a project to address this critical issue, and as a result developed a set of publications to support trainers, practitioners, and families.


Mexican American Legal Defense Fund (MALDF)

Founded in 1968 MALDF is the nations leading non-profit Latino legal organization. MALDF promotes equality and justice through advocacy, litigation, public policy, and education in the areas of employment, immigrants’ rights, political access, voting rights and language rights.


National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

1313 L Street NW, Suite 500
Washington, DC 20005
Telephone: 202-232-8777 or 800-424-2460
Fax: 202-328-1846
Email: naeyc@naeyc.org

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is the nation’s largest organization of early childhood professionals and others dedicated to improving the quality of early childhood education programs for children birth through age eight. NAEYC’s primary goals are to improve professional practice and working conditions in early childhood education and to build public understanding and support for high-quality early childhood programs.


National Associaton for Multicultural Education (NAME)

The National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME) was founded in 1990 to bring together individuals from all academic levels and disciplines and from diverse educational institutions, and other organizations, occupations and communities who had an interest in multicultural education. NAME is committed to a philosophy of inclusion that embraces the basic tenets of democracy and cultural pluralism.


National Black Child Development Institute Inc. (NBCDI)

To give our future the chance it deserves, NBCDI advances a multi-faceted agenda to promote and protect the well-being of all African American children. NBCDI’s wide range of programs respond to the necessity to replace the one-size fits-all, deficit-oriented paradigm with initiatives that serve children based on their strengths and needs. Our programs assist children and families who are experiencing challenges in the areas of early care and education, health, parenting, education, and child welfare.

NBCDI’s affiliate chapters composed of volunteers are not only reaching out to African American children; they’re connecting with them in ways that make a difference. NBCDI also serves as a resource to people who are professionally and personally committed to children and families.


National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC)

NCCC provides national leadership and contributes to the body of knowledge on cultural and linguistic competency within systems and organizations. Major emphasis is placed on translating evidence into policy and practice for programs and personnel concerned with health and mental health care delivery, administration, education and advocacy.

The NCCC is a component of the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development (GUCCHD) and is housed within the Department of Pediatrics of the Georgetown University Medical Center. It provides training, technical assistance, and consultation, contributes to knowledge through publications and research, creates tools and resources to support health and mental health care providers and systems, supports leaders to promote and sustain cultural and linguistic competency, and collaborates with an extensive network of private and public entities to advance the implementation of these concepts.


National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt)

The United States is fortunate to have a diverse population, but in the 23 decades since its establishment, the US has faced many challenges to its democratic ideals. Chief among these has been responding equitably to the ethnic, linguistic, cultural, and religious differences that characterize its people. Schools continue to reflect this struggle even today.

NCCRESt works with state and local systems to address ingrained school practices that contribute to perpetuating disparities in access to learning. We provide technical assistance and professional development to schools and their communities, including resources for early intervention, universal screening, progress monitoring, and culturally-responsive response to intervention.


National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA)

The National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) works to address the issues of child abuse and neglect through training, research, public policy, and grassroots community development. NICWA also works to support compliance with the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA), which seeks to keep American Indian children with American Indian families.

NICWA improves the lives of American Indian children and families by helping tribes and other service providers implement services that are culturally competent, community-based, and focused on the strengths and assets of families. This work includes collaborating with tribal and urban Indian child welfare programs to increase their service capacity, enhancing tribal-state relationships, and providing training, technical assistance, information services and alliance building.


National Indian Parent Information Center

The National Indian Parent Information Center is a national program that provides information (printed, by email, phone and workshops) on disability issues for Native family members who have children with disabilities and the professional who work with them. We provide workshops on and off reservations to Tribes, Nations and Clans on Disability Laws and Parent Leadership. Our services for families are at no cost to family members. We hope to give Indian families a voice that will impact the special education process.


Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center (NAPTAC)

NAPTAC is a project within EPICS to provide training and technical assistance to Parent Training Information Centers (PTI’s) and Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRC’s) nationwide on providing effective, culturally responsive services to Native American families of children with disabilities, as well as youth with disabilities.


Newcomers Tool Kit

The Newcomer Tool Kit is designed to help U.S. educators; elementary and secondary teachers, principals, and other school staff who work directly with immigrant students—including asylees and refugees—and their families.

The Newcomer Tool Kit has 5 chapters, and contains an overview, sample tools, and resources.


Self Assessment Tool for Early Childhood Programs Serving the Homeless (PDF)

This Self-Assessment Tool for Early Childhood Programs Serving Families Experiencing Homelessness has been specifically designed for child care, Head Start and Early Head Start, and public pre-k programs as a guide for welcoming and supporting families and children experiencing homelessness into these programs. We know that ending family homelessness will require us to implement whole-of-community strategies to ensure that every member of each family experiencing homelessness is offered the services and the supports they need to thrive. Early care and education providers play a critical role in identifying and supporting families with young children who are experiencing homelessness and connecting those families to other resources within their community.


Teaching Tolerance

Founded in 1991 by the Southern Poverty Law Center, Teaching Tolerance is dedicated to reducing prejudice, improving intergroup relations and supporting equitable school experiences for our nation’s children.

  • Immigrant Refugee Children: A guide for Educators and School Support Staff
    This guide was created for educators, school support staff and service providers who teach, mentor and help open the doors of opportunity for undocumented youth and unaccompanied and refugee children currently living in the United States. Educators, school support staff and service providers are often the first individuals a student and/or family comes out to as undocumented.
  • Best Practices Best Practices for Serving English Language Learners and Their Families
    For many educators, helping children learn English is a joy and a privilege. But classroom educators may not always know how their administration is approaching ELL students and vice versa. Reviewing a few key practices as a staff can help move the entire school toward a comprehensive and culturally responsive approach to serving English Language Learners and their families. This guide can help get the process started.

Dual Language Learners

California’s Best Practices for Young Dual Language Learners (PDF)

Published: 2013
This publication provides early childhood educators with valuable information on the most current research on the development of young dual language learners. This series of research overviews spans the disciplines of neuroscience, cognitive science, developmental psychology, assessment, educational research, family engagement, and special needs.



Colorín Colorado

Colorín Colorado is a free web-based service that provides information, activities and advice for educators and Spanish-speaking families of English language learners (ELLs). Colorín Colorado is an educational initiative of WETA, the flagship public television and radio station in the nation’s capital. Major funding comes from the American Federation of Teachers, with additional support from the National Institute for Literacy and the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs.


Cultural Linguistic Ability Diversity (CLAD)

This website, which we call CLAD, provides a variety of resources that are intentionally identified and selected to support the understanding and application of cultural, linguistic, and ability diversity practices within early childhood education. Learning to include and celebrate CLAD in early childhood environments is essential to supporting the full potential of all young children.



Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (ECTA)

Telephone: 919-962-2001
TDD: 919-843-3269
Fax: 919-966-7463
Email: ectacenter@unc.edu

ECTA is comprised of several recent OSEP-funded TA centers (NECTAC, CELL and TACSEI and ECO within the next two years). The purpose of ECTA is to improve state early intervention and early childhood special education service systems, increase the implementation of effective practices, and enhance the outcomes of these programs for young children and their families.


Head Start Early Childhood Learning & Knowledge Center (ECLKC): Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness

The Head Start National Center on Quality Teaching and Learning will identify, develop, and promote teaching and learning practices with a strong evidence base to help Head Start programs achieve the best possible outcomes for young children. The Center will develop products, deliver professional development opportunities, and work closely with Head Start training and technical assistance providers to ensure that effective educational strategies become everyday practices. This section focuses on resources to support children with disabilities.


Improving Access and Opportunity for Latinos in Early Childhood

What are the elements of a quality education for young Latino children and their teachers that is culturally and linguistically responsive to their needs? The Center for Children & Families conducted a project to address this critical issue, and as a result developed a set of publications to support trainers, practitioners, and families.


National Council of La Raza (NCLR)

NCLR has profiled four early childhood education programs from our network of Affiliates that exemplify best practices in serving young Latino and ELL children and their families. Each report profiles one Affiliate and provides policy recommendations to help bring these programs to scale.

The link above gives you access to 4 downloadable reports on Preparing Young Latino Children for School Success: Best Practices in 1) Professional Development 2) Students Assessments 3) Language Instruction and 4) Family Engagement


Policy Statement on Supporting the Development of Children Who are Dual Language Learners in Early Childhood Programs (PDF)

Published: 2016
A major challenge facing early childhood education and the k–12 education system in the United States is the fact that as the population changes, the particular needs of children change with it. One of the largest demographic shifts in the last decade is the increase in the number of children who speak English as their second language. The majority of these children are born in the United States and thus from a very young age are acquiring both the language of their family as well as the language of the larger community. These very young children are dual language learners (DLLs).


Teaching Tolerance

Founded in 1991 by the Southern Poverty Law Center, Teaching Tolerance is dedicated to reducing prejudice, improving intergroup relations and supporting equitable school experiences for our nation’s children.

  • Immigrant Refugee Children: A guide for Educators and School Support Staff
    This guide was created for educators, school support staff and service providers who teach, mentor and help open the doors of opportunity for undocumented youth and unaccompanied and refugee children currently living in the United States. Educators, school support staff and service providers are often the first individuals a student and/or family comes out to as undocumented.
  • Best Practices Best Practices for Serving English Language Learners and Their Families
    For many educators, helping children learn English is a joy and a privilege. But classroom educators may not always know how their administration is approaching ELL students and vice versa. Reviewing a few key practices as a staff can help move the entire school toward a comprehensive and culturally responsive approach to serving English Language Learners and their families. This guide can help get the process started.

Vermont Young DLL Tool Kit

Published: March 2016 | Authors: Camille Catlett, Susan M. Moore, & Clara Perez-Mendez
The purpose of this toolkit is to provide early childhood colleagues with evidence-based practices, tools, and strategies to support young Dual Language Learners (DLLs) and their families. Despite a slight emphasis on Vermont, it is broadly applicable for practitioners and others across the country.


Multiple Lanugages

All About Young Children

All About Young Children: Information for Families on Children’s Early Development. This website provides resources for families based on the California Infant/Toddler Learning & Development Foundations and the California Preschool Learning Foundations. This website presents information for families that focuses on key infant/toddler learning and development foundations and preschool learning foundations and includes discussion about those foundations by groups of parents. The information in the website is available in 7 different languages


American Federation for the Blind (AFB)

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) is a national nonprofit that expands possibilities for people with vision loss.

AFB’s priorities include broadening access to technology; elevating the quality of information and tools for the professionals who serve people with vision loss; and promoting independent and healthy living for people with vision loss by providing them and their families with relevant and timely resources. AFB’s work in these areas is supported by the strong presence the organization maintains in Washington, DC, ensuring the rights and interests of people with vision loss are represented in our nation’s public policies.




Autism Society of America (ASA)

ASA, the nation’s leading grassroots autism organization, exists to improve the lives of all affected by autism. We do this by increasing public awareness about the day-to-day issues faced by people on the spectrum, advocating for appropriate services for individuals across the lifespan, and providing the latest information regarding treatment, education, research and advocacy.

  • The Autism Speaks Network
    The Autism Speaks Network is a new digital network designed to be the home of premier autism video content online and mobile. The Autism Speaks Network (TASN) is a subsidiary of Autism Speaks and will curate important shows like Autism Live, @AspergerSadie, Kerry’s Korner, The Autism Team, The Dr. G Aspie Show and Autism Today TV, and house them in one location for simple and convenient viewing.
  • Sitio en Español (Site in Spanish)

Autism Speaks

Autism Speaks was founded in February 2005 by Bob and Suzanne Wright, grandparents of a child with autism. Since then, Autism Speaks has grown into the nation’s largest autism science and advocacy organization, dedicated to funding research into the causes, prevention, treatments and a cure for autism; increasing awareness of autism spectrum disorders; and advocating for the needs of individuals with autism and their families.


Bananas Inc.

BANANAS is a child care resource and referral service. We often just call ourselves an R&R, short for Resource and Referral. We helped create R&R’s in California and in the rest of the country. We exist to help parents find child care and children’s services in their communities.

Sounds simple? Well, a lot goes into that task. We help develop new child care resources and maintain existing ones so that parents have a good selection to choose from. We provide counseling to parents as they tackle the difficult task of choosing child care. We provide back-up support in different languages (written materials, workshops, support groups, advice line) to parents. We participate in myriad cooperative activities in the community to work on building a better world for children and families.


Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive Initiative of the US Department of Health and Human Services

This initiative draws heavily on previous developmental and behavioral screening efforts by consolidating materials from a wide array of federal agencies and their non-federal partners. As part of this initiative, they have published a compendium of research-based developmental screening tools appropriate for use across a wide range of settings and tailored guides/resources for use with the screening tools geared toward nine different audiences including early care and education providers, early intervention providers, home visitors and families. The guides addresses the importance of developmental and behavioral screening, how to talk to parents, where to go for help, and how to select the most appropriate screening tool for the population served as well as the provider implementing the screening.


California Department of Developmental Services (DDS)

P.O. Box 944202
Sacramento, CA 94244-2020

The California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) is the agency through which the state of California provides services and supports to children and adults with developmental disabilities. These disabilities include mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and autism and its related conditions. DDS is California’s lead agency for services for children birth to three years of age, as defined under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA ’04).

For information on programs and resources for children ages birth to 3 visit the Birth to 36 Months Home Page.

There are several Web links for agencies and services related to Early Start:


Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE)

The Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE) works to increase the nation’s capacity to effectively resolve special education disputes, reducing the use of expensive adversarial processes. CADRE works with state and local education and early intervention systems, parent centers, families and educators to improve programs and results for children with disabilities. CADRE is funded by the Office of Special Education Programs at the US Department of Education to serve as the National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education.


Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ECMHC)

The Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (CECMHC) was funded as an Innovation and Improvement Project by the Office of Head Start in October 2008. The 3-year grant brings together a group of university researchers to develop strategies to help Head Start programs build a strong mental health foundation for their children, families and staff. The site houses resources for Head Start mental health consultants, staff, families, administrators and T&TA Providers.


Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL)

The goal of the Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) is to promote the adoption and sustained use of evidence-based early literacy learning practices. This site has resources for early childhood intervention practitioners, parents, and other caregivers of children, birth to five years of age, with identified disabilities, developmental delays, and those at-risk for poor outcomes.

  • Spanish Practice Guides for Use with Parents
    Parents who speak Spanish may use these products to provide their infants, toddlers, or preschoolers with fun and exciting literacy learning experiences. Practitioners working with parents who speak Spanish may also find these helpful.
  • CELL Videos
    CELL videos are designed for the teacher, parent, trainer, coach and home visitor. Each video introduces and illustrates a key component of the CELL Early Literacy Learning Model.

Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR)

The Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR), produced under the US Department of Education Office of Special Education, serves as a central resource of information and products to the community of Parent Training Information (PTI) Centers and the Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs), so that they can focus their efforts on serving families of children with disabilities. The site provides resources by topic area, some in English and Spanish and when available, by state.


Center on Technology and Disability (CTD)

The Center on Technology and Disability (CTD) is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP). The Center is designed to increase the capacity of families and providers to advocate for, acquire, and implement effective assistive and instructional technology (AT/IT) practices, devices, and services. Research-based technologies, used appropriately, have great potential to help infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities participate fully in daily routines; have increased access to the general educational curriculum; improve their functional outcomes and educational results; and meet college- and career-ready standards.

  • CTD Library
  • Isabel Needs Assistive Technology (Video)
    In this story, you’ll meet Marta, the mother of Isabel, a young girl with fine motor and learning disabilities. The video introduces viewers to assistive technology (AT) and takes them through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) meeting during which AT is considered. This video is captioned in English and is “described” as well. FCTD and Dicapta invite you to view and share this video with your colleagues and the families you serve. This video was originally produced as a Spanish-language resource. Voice-over and captioning were added to provide access to larger audience.

Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL)

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) is a national resource center for disseminating research and evidence-based practices to early childhood programs across the country.

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) is focused on promoting the social emotional development and school readiness of young children birth to age 5. To support this goal, we have developed a conceptual model of evidence-based practices for promoting young children’s social emotional competence and preventing and addressing challenging behavior.

  • Sitio en Español (Site in Spanish)
  • How Do I Decide? Series of Guidelines
    The first two installments in this new series provide guidelines on: How to Choose a Social-Emotional Curriculum and When to Seek Outside Help for Children’s Problem Behavior.
  • Online Videos
    Two CSEFEL videos, Promoting Social Emotional Competence and Practical Strategies for Teaching Social Emotional Skills, can now be viewed online in their entirety.
  • Home Visiting Training Package
    One of the last products developed by TACSEI was a three-day training package for professionals who provide home visiting services (e.g., Part C, Early Head Start). They are not posted on the CSEFEL web site for download, but you can order them for cost of production $20.

Child Mind Institute: Trauma Resources

The Child Mind Institute has prepared free trauma resources to aid parents, educators, and other adults in talking to children and adolescents about potentially traumatic events and identifying those who might benefit from more focused professional attention. Our children can be more sensitive to challenges around them because of their life experience and they need our support. Resources are available in English, Spanish, French, Arabic, German, Hebrew, Italian, Chinese, Russian, and Bengali.


Child Welfare Information Gateway

Child Welfare Information Gateway promotes the safety, permanency, and well-being of children, youth, and families by connecting child welfare, adoption, and related professionals as well as the general public to information, resources, and tools covering topics on child welfare, child abuse and neglect, out-of-home care, adoption, and more.

A service of the Children’s Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, we provide access to print and electronic publications, websites, databases, and online learning tools for improving child welfare practice, including resources that can be shared with families.


Chinese Parents Association for the Disabled (CPAD)

CPAD Is a non-profit organization dedicated to help individuals with special needs and their families (e.g. Autism, Down syndrome, Cerebral Palsy… etc). All the parent members are volunteers, and strive to help each individual achieve his or her full potential toward a meaningful and productive life; to encourage opportunities of social integration, and social inclusion into mainstream society. We can provide information about various disabilities, suggest referrals to appropriate community resources, and offer interpreter/translation assistance. On a periodic basis, CPAD also invites subject matter experts and legal petitioners to speak on subjects such as how to fight for better educational services and gain better understanding of their legal rights.


Colorín Colorado

Colorín Colorado is a free web-based service that provides information, activities and advice for educators and Spanish-speaking families of English language learners (ELLs). Colorín Colorado is an educational initiative of WETA, the flagship public television and radio station in the nation’s capital. Major funding comes from the American Federation of Teachers, with additional support from the National Institute for Literacy and the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs.



Culturally & Linguistically Appropriate Services Early Childhood Research Institute (CLAS)

The CLAS Institute identifies, evaluates, and promotes effective and appropriate early intervention practices and preschool practices that are sensitive and respectful to children and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

The CLAS Institute identifies, collects, reviews, catalogs, abstracts, and describes materials and practices developed for children and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and professionals who work with them.



Disability Rights California

Disability Rights California works to bring about fairness and justice for people with disabilities. To reach those goals of fairness and justice, they may: file lawsuits on behalf of individuals or groups: investigate charges of abuse and neglect; build peer/self advocacy groups; forge community partnerships; advocate for change in laws, regulations, and public policy, and provide information to those who may not know about their rights.


Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (ECTA)

Telephone: 919-962-2001
TDD: 919-843-3269
Fax: 919-966-7463
Email: ectacenter@unc.edu

ECTA is comprised of several recent OSEP-funded TA centers (NECTAC, CELL and TACSEI and ECO within the next two years). The purpose of ECTA is to improve state early intervention and early childhood special education service systems, increase the implementation of effective practices, and enhance the outcomes of these programs for young children and their families.


Ellen Satter Institute: Helping Adults and Children be Joyful and Confident with Eating

Ellyn Satter is an internationally recognized authority on eating and feeding. Practical, warm and empowering, Satter integrates her 40 years of experience in helping adults be more positive, organized and nurturing in caring for themselves and their children. She emphasizes competency rather than deficiency: providing rather than depriving: and trust rather than control. Her theoretically grounded and clinically sound methods allow the individual’s own capacity for effective and rewarding food behavior to evolve.


Enabling Education Network (EENET)

EENET is an information-sharing network on the issue of inclusive education. Our network is open to everyone. We share information originating in countries of the South and encourage conversations and debates about inclusion and rights in education.


Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development

The Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development is produced by the Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development (CEECD) and the Strategic Knowledge Cluster on Early Child Development (SKC-ECD). Respectively based at the Université de Montréal and Université Laval (Quebec, Canada), these two organizations have built over the years a solid network of international experts who gather, synthesize and comment, in their respective domain of expertise, the most up-to-date scientific knowledge available on the development of young children, from conception to age five. The website is available in English, French, Spanish, Portugese and Russian.


Epilepsy Foundation

The Epilepsy Foundation is the national voluntary agency solely dedicated to the welfare of the 2.7 million people with epilepsy in the U.S. and their families. The organization works to ensure that people with seizures are able to participate in all life experiences; and to prevent, control and cure epilepsy through research, education, advocacy and services. In addition to programs conducted at the national level, epilepsy clients throughout the United States are served by affiliated Epilepsy Foundation offices in nearly 100 communities. The three affiliates in California are the Epilepsy Foundation – Greater Los Angeles, Epilepsy Foundation of Northern California, and Epilepsy Foundation of San Diego.


Epilepsy Foundation of Northern California

The Epilepsy Foundation of Northern California is dedicated to providing information, resources and support to the over 140,000 Northern Californians living with epilepsy. Our goal is to ensure that people with seizures are able to participate in all life experiences, to improve how the community views epilepsy, and to dispel myths about this condition by providing information through statewide training, events, and programs.


Exceptional Family Resource Center (EFRC)

Based in San Diego, the Exceptional Family Resource Center (EFRC) is a community-based collaborative agency, staffed by parents and professionals. It is designed to serve families of individuals with special needs by providing a broad continuum of information, education, and support. Services and supports are offered in English and Spanish.


Federation for Children with Special Needs

The Federation is a center for parents and parent organizations to work together on behalf of children with special needs and their families. We can help! Organized in 1975 as a coalition of parent groups representing children with a variety of disabilities, the Federation operates a Parent Center in Massachusetts which offers a variety of services to parents, parent groups, and others who are concerned with children with special needs.


First Words Project

FIRST WORDS© Project is a longitudinal research investigation in the Florida State University Autism Institute in the College of Medicine directed by Dr. Amy Wetherby. Our major goal is to identify early signs of developmental language disorders, autism spectrum disorder, and other communication delays in children from 9 to 24 months of age. The website includes downloadable books and video in English and Spanish that demonstrate developmental milestones of communication for gestures in the 16 by 16 (16 gestures by 16 months). Also on the site is a video growth chart that shows what can be expected at various ages.



healthfinder.gov

healthfinder.gov, a government Web site where you will find information and tools to help you and those you care about stay healthy.

  • Sitio en Español (Site in Spanish)
    Based on the English version , health finder.gov en Español offers personalized and actionable health information presented in an easy to read format. The quick Guide to Health Living provide information on over 40 different health topics from acupuncture to vaccinations. Each heath topic includes small steps and quick tips you can follow to be health and stay healthy.



Kids Health

KidsHealth is more than just the facts about health. As part of The Nemours Foundation’s Center for Children’s Health Media, KidsHealth also provides families with perspective, advice, and comfort about a wide range of physical, emotional, and behavioral issues that affect children and teens. The website has an easy to understand description of dwarfism, it’s origin, diagnosis and tips for helping a child with dwarfism.


LD OnLine

LD OnLine is the world’s leading web site on learning disabilities and ADHD, serving more than 200,000 parents, teachers, and other professionals each month. LD OnLine seeks to help children and adults reach their full potential by providing accurate and up-to-date information and advice about learning disabilities and ADHD.


Let’s Move! Child Care

First Lady Michelle Obama unveiled Let’s Move! Child Care in June 2011 as a new effort to work with child care providers to help our youngest children get off to a healthy start. The First Lady released a fact sheet and checklist (PDF) that providers and parents can use as a tool to encourage healthy eating and physical activity and limit screen time for young children. The website, developed by Nemours, provides free, comprehensive resources and tools in Spanish and English.


Matrix Parent Network + Resource Center

Matrix is a parent-run information and resource center providing no-cost services to families of children with special needs (birth through age 26) in Marin, Napa, Solano and Sonoma counties.

Through the delivery of comprehensive support services, Matrix helps families in Marin, Napa, Solano, and Sonoma Counties become well informed and better able to advocate for their children in order to enrich their lives.


National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC)

NCCC provides national leadership and contributes to the body of knowledge on cultural and linguistic competency within systems and organizations. Major emphasis is placed on translating evidence into policy and practice for programs and personnel concerned with health and mental health care delivery, administration, education and advocacy.

The NCCC is a component of the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development (GUCCHD) and is housed within the Department of Pediatrics of the Georgetown University Medical Center. It provides training, technical assistance, and consultation, contributes to knowledge through publications and research, creates tools and resources to support health and mental health care providers and systems, supports leaders to promote and sustain cultural and linguistic competency, and collaborates with an extensive network of private and public entities to advance the implementation of these concepts.


National Center for Families Learning (NCFL)

NCFL provides support and strategies to a network of entities involved in advancing education and families learning together, including educators, schools, community based organizations, and libraries. Our efforts support learners of all ages in these environments in concert with our advocates and partners.


National Child Trauma Stress Network: Resources for Educators

Provides a comprehensive website on trauma with information and resources for parents, care givers and educators in English and Spanish.

  • The Road to Recovery: Supporting Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Who Have Experienced Trauma
    The Road to Recovery is a training that provides an overview for providers on how to work with children and families who are living with intellectual and development disabilities who have experienced trauma. This Toolkit consists of a Facilitator Guide and a Participant Manual. Together, they are designed to teach basic knowledge, skills, and values about working with children with IDD who have had traumatic experiences, and how to use this knowledge to support children’s safety, well-being, happiness, and recovery through trauma-informed practice.
  • Psychological First Aid Online
    PFA online includes a 6-hour interactive course that puts the participant in the role of a provider in a post-disaster scene. This professionally-narrated course is for individuals new to disaster response who want to learn the core goals of PFA, as well as for seasoned practitioners who want a review.

National Down Syndrome Congress

The NDSC works to empower its members and all people with Down syndrome by creating a national climate in which all people will recognize and embrace the value and dignity of people with Down syndrome. The NDSC operates the NDSC Center which serves as a clearinghouse for information on Down syndrome. The Center provides up-to-date information on topics of interest to people with Down syndrome, family members, friends, professionals and interested others.


National Down Syndrome Society

The mission of NDSS is to benefit people with Down syndrome and their families through national leadership in education, research and advocacy. Our activities include:

  • Developing and disseminating quality educational materials and programs.
  • Initiating and advancing basic, clinical and applied research.
  • Shaping and advocating for improved public policy, increased public resources and services for people with Down syndrome.
  • Working in partnership with our affiliates and other support organizations.
  • Sitio En Español (Site in Spanish)


National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)

Established in 1988, NIDCD is mandated to conduct and support biomedical and behavioral research and research training in the normal and disordered processes of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, and language.

It is estimated that more than 46 million people in the United States suffer some form of disordered communication. NIDCD has focused national attention on disorders of human communication and has contributed to advances in biomedical and behavioral research that will improve the lives of millions of individuals with communication disorders. NIDCD has made important contributions to the body of knowledge needed to help those who experience communication disorders and to advance research in all aspects of human communication.


National PTA


PTA’s mission is to make every child’s potential a reality by engaging and empowering families and communities to advocate for all children.


PACER Center

The Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers is an innovative project that provides technical assistance to the over 100 Parent Centers funded under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The ALLIANCE National Center at PACER Center conducts national conferences, produces materials on special education topics, and offers high quality expertise to Parent Centers nationwide.


Parent Center Hub: Legacy Resources from NICHCY

The CPIR is pleased to give a the home to many of the resources developed by NICHCY, the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities. NICHCY’s funding ended in October 2013, but many of its products and webpages will live on here, where we can maintain their accuracy and continue to make them available to families, professionals, and Parent Centers.


Parent Tool Kit

This toolkit, produced by NBC News Education Nation, will help you navigate your child’s journey from pre-kindergarten through high school. It is designed to help you track and support progress at each stage. Produced by NBC’s Education Nation project, the Parent Toolkit website has comprehensive resources and minute-long videos for parents of kids at every age and grade. The content covers a variety of topics, including health and wellness, academics, and social and emotional development. All the videos and resources are available in both English and Spanish.


Pathways.org

Pathways Awareness Foundation is a national non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness about the benefit of early detection and early therapy for children with early motor delays. We strive to help all children develop to reach their fullest potential.

Our website, designed for both parents and professionals, contains valuable information about children’s physical development and crucial infant milestones, including a growth and development chart in 11 different languages that lets you track your child’s physical, play, and speech milestones from 3 to 15 months. Great tip: Print out our chart and keep it on your refrigerator or above your changing table!


People First Language

For too long, people who happen to have conditions we call “disabilities” have been subjected to devaluation, marginalization, prejudice, and more. And the first way to devalue someone is through language, by using words or labels to identify a person/group as “less-than,” as “the other,” “not like us,” and so forth. Once a person/group has been identified this way, it makes it easier to justify prejudice and discrimination. Our language shapes our attitudes; our attitudes shape our language; they’re intertwined. And our attitudes and language drive our actions!


Project ABC

Project ABC (Los Angeles County) is designed to create a system of care for young children who are in need of mental health services in the Los Angeles area. Our goal is ensure that children birth to five years have access to mental health services that are family-centered, strength-based, and culturally competent. Families are the focus of our efforts and are key partners in everything we do. Parents are responsible for ensuring the family voice is the driving force in the treatment of children with emotional and behavioral problems. Family voice and choice is essential to obtaining the best care for our children. Site includes resources for parents, caregivers, professionals and includes tip sheets, video and radio.

  • Tip Sheets
    Include topics such as “10 Things to Know About Infant Mental Health”
  • Videos
    Videos include “Tantrums Happen!”, “Rough Day”, and “All Babies Cry”.
  • ResourcesSome resources also available in Chinese, Korean and Spanish


Reasons for Concern: That your child or a child in your care may need special help (PDF)

Published: 2004 | Size: 7MB
The first five years are very important in a child’s life. The sooner a child is identified, the sooner the child and family can receive specialized services to support growth and development. Parents, family members and caregivers may have concerns about a child’s development and seek help when needed. This brochure developed by the California Department of Education in collaboration with the Department of Developmental Disabilities lists reasons for concern related to risk factors, behaviors, seeing, hearing, moving, communicating and thinking that may indicate that a child may need special help.

Also available in:


Right Choice for Kids

Right Choice for Kids was originally created by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) to inform families about the importance of high-quality early childhood education programs for young children. However, they’ve let their domain expire in October 2012, so we took over the domain and are currently in the process of setting up something new, with the needs of young children in mind.


SAMHSA: Coping with Violence and Traumatic Events: Tips for Talking with Children

Provides parent tips for talking with children of different ages in downloadable pdfs in English, Chinese, Japanese and Spanish.

  • Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event A Guide for Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers (PDF)
    Children and youth can face emotional strains after a traumatic event such as a car crash or violence. Disasters also may leave them with long-lasting harmful effects. When children experience a trauma, watch it on TV, or overhear others discussing it, they can feel scared, confused, or anxious. Young people react to trauma differently than adults. Some may react right away; others may show signs that they are having a difficult time much later. As such, adults do not always know when a child needs help coping. This tip sheet will help parents, caregivers, and teachers learn some common reactions, respond in a helpful way, and know when to seek support.

Special Parents Information Network

Parents of children with special needs may feel isolated and overwhelmed with the medical, emotional, financial, educational and social issues they face as they raise their child. SPIN is a non-profit parent-to-parent support and information network serving parents, guardians and families in Santa Cruz and San Benito Counties who have a child or children with special needs of any age.

In 1985 a group of Santa Cruz County parents of children with special needs began meeting together for support. Through the years parents have continued to maintain the organization that, in 1996, became known as SPIN (Special Parents Information Network). In June, 2000, SPIN became incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable corporation. SPIN continues to support and provide information about resources to strengthen families.



Support for Families of Children with Disabilities

Is a parent-run San Francisco-based nonprofit organization founded in 1982. We support families of children with any kind of disability or special health care need as they face challenges. Our newsletter is published quarterly in English, Spanish and Chinese. For a free subscription to the newsletter, and/or to have a copy snail-mailed to you, please call Open Gate at 415-920-5040, or email info@supportforfamilies.org. Be sure to include your complete address and your preferred language.


Supporting Young Children and Families Impacted by Immigration Policies: Recorded Webinar

Published: September 27, 2017 | Early Childhood Investigations: Hannah Matthews, Dr. Michael McNeil, Wendy Cervantes
Harsh immigration policies undermine the safety, health, and overall development of young children in immigrant families, the vast majority of whom are U.S. citizens. New and proposed immigration policies—including increased immigration enforcement actions–have threatened the well-being of millions of children, threatening to separate them from their parents and to cut them off from critical health and nutrition assistance. This power webinar, presented by Wendy Cervantes, Dr. Michael McNeil and Hannah Matthews will discuss how the recent executive orders and other immigration policy proposals impact young children in immigrant families and what early childhood providers can do to help support their students and families who may be at risk.

Resources from the webinar:


Talk with Me Baby

Published: Sep 21, 2015 | 2:38 minutes
The team behind Talk With Me Baby™ is a collaboration of six leadership organizations, all working to bring the concept of language nutrition into public awareness and educate caregivers on the importance of talking with their baby every day, in an effort to close the word gap. Talking with your baby helps grow your baby’s brain. Learn how early exposure to language can help a child build vocabulary, communicate better with adults, be ready for kindergarten and develop an essential life skill: the ability to read by the end of third grade.


Talking is Teaching: Talk, Read, Sing

“Talking is Teaching: Talk, Read, Sing” is a campaign of Too Small to Fail in partnership with various organizations that are dedicated to improving early childhood development. It offers the free downloadable Sesame Street Family Guide: Talking is Teaching available in English and Spanish. It helps caregivers and parents fill each day with words, stories, songs … and love. Inside are tips and activities around talking, reading and singing with children and Milestone Cards to use as the child grows.


Teaching Pyramid: Training and Technical Assistance Model

The Teaching Pyramid approach provides a systematic framework that promotes social and emotional development, provides support for children’s appropriate behavior, prevents challenging behavior, and addresses problematic behavior. The WestEd Center for Child and Family Studies offers comprehensive professional development packages for infant/toddler, preschool, and early elementary educators. WestEd’s Teaching Pyramid is based on evidence-based practice originally developed by the Center on the Social Emotional Foundations in Early Learning (CSEFEL), authorized by California Department of Education (CDE), and aligned with California’s Early Learning and Development System.

Materials for Families and Classrooms available in Chinese and Spanish:

Training & Technical Assistance


United Cerebral Palsy

Founded in 1949, the national organization and its nationwide network of affiliates strive to ensure the inclusion of persons with disabilities in every facet of society—from the Web to the workplace, from the classroom to the community. United Cerebral Palsy’s mission is to advance the independence, productivity and full citizenship of people with disabilities through an affiliate network.