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California MAP to Inclusion & Belonging

California MAP to Inclusion & Belonging

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Early Identification: Learn the Signs Act Early

Teacher engaging with child during classroom activityThis area of the MAP to Inclusion and Belonging website was developed in collaboration with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Learn the Signs Act Early Grant partners in California. The goal of the grant is to promote distribution of the free CDC materials on developmental milestones to aid families, early care and education providers, home visitors, health care providers and others in identifying the early signs of a developmental delay. In addition, the categories to information found here onHealthy Development and Developmental Milestones, Working with Families, When Concerns Arise, Developmental Screening, Referral for Evaluation and Assessment and ongoing support through Community Resources/Support for Families provide a well rounded set of resources to support families and providers to “Act Early” to address concerns.

The Early Identification Guide (PDF) provides a simple graphic and summary describing the key elements of early identification and Developmental Screening.

The Road Map for Helping Your Child Grow (PDF) is a tool that service providers can give to families to document the summary results of an ASQ Screening, along with next steps and resources.

Healthy Development and Developmental Milestones

Knowledge of healthy development and developmental milestones benefits parents and service providers in being able to support a child’s growth and identify concerns. The resources below provide information and guidance for families and professionals for ongoing observation and discussion about a child’s development.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive Initiative of the US Department of Health and Human Services

This initiative draws heavily on previous developmental and behavioral screening efforts by consolidating materials from a wide array of federal agencies and their non-federal partners. As part of this initiative, they have published a compendium of research-based developmental screening tools appropriate for use across a wide range of settings and tailored guides/resources for use with the screening tools geared toward nine different audiences including early care and education providers, early intervention providers, home visitors and families. The guides addresses the importance of developmental and behavioral screening, how to talk to parents, where to go for help, and how to select the most appropriate screening tool for the population served as well as the provider implementing the screening.


Bringing the Signs of Early Autism into Focus Video Tutorial (Video)

Published: Jun 11, 2013 | 9 minutes
The Kennedy Krieger Institute and Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have published a free online video to improve the recognition of the early signs of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among pediatricians, parents and early intervention providers. The tutorial consists of six video clips that compare toddlers with no signs of ASD to toddlers with early signs of ASD and includes an explanation of how the specific behaviors exhibited by each child are either suggestive of ASD or typical child development.


First Signs

First Signs is a national non-profit organization dedicated to educating parents and professionals about the early warning signs of autism and related disorders.


First Words Project

FIRST WORDS© Project is a longitudinal research investigation in the Florida State University Autism Institute in the College of Medicine directed by Dr. Amy Wetherby. Our major goal is to identify early signs of developmental language disorders, autism spectrum disorder, and other communication delays in children from 9 to 24 months of age. The website includes downloadable books and video in English and Spanish that demonstrate developmental milestones of communication for gestures in the 16 by 16 (16 gestures by 16 months). Also on the site is a video growth chart that shows what can be expected at various ages.


Pathways.org

Pathways Awareness Foundation is a national non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness about the benefit of early detection and early therapy for children with early motor delays. We strive to help all children develop to reach their fullest potential.

Our website, designed for both parents and professionals, contains valuable information about children’s physical development and crucial infant milestones, including a growth and development chart in 11 different languages that lets you track your child’s physical, play, and speech milestones from 3 to 15 months. Great tip: Print out our chart and keep it on your refrigerator or above your changing table!



Will They Grow Out of It? Should I Be Concerned?

One of the challenges of parenting is knowing when it is time to get help for a child’s development, behavior and learning. When a child seems behind or something just doesn’t seem quite right, it can be difficult to know what to do.


Zero to Three

Zero to Three is a national, nonprofit organization dedicated solely to advancing the healthy development of babies and young children. Zero to Three disseminates key developmental information, trains providers, promotes model approaches and standards of practice, and works to increase public awareness about the significance of the first three years of life.

  • Little Kids, Big Questions Parenting Podcast Series
    This series addresses some of the most common (and challenging) issues facing parents of babies and toddlers, such as: helping a baby learn to sleep through the night; dealing with a picky eater; and learning to set limits on children’s behavior.

Select link for more information on ZERO TO THREE


Working with Families

A child’s growth and development is best supported when families and professionals work together. Below is information to support building strong relationships, communicating effectively and learning about a family’s culture and beliefs.

Family Engagement (MAP)

The MAP… Making Access Possible Project team has identified the following websites and resources that support family engagement and promote partnerships with families.


Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE)

The Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE) works to increase the nation’s capacity to effectively resolve special education disputes, reducing the use of expensive adversarial processes. CADRE works with state and local education and early intervention systems, parent centers, families and educators to improve programs and results for children with disabilities. CADRE is funded by the Office of Special Education Programs at the US Department of Education to serve as the National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education.


Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ECMHC)

The Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (CECMHC) was funded as an Innovation and Improvement Project by the Office of Head Start in October 2008. The 3-year grant brings together a group of university researchers to develop strategies to help Head Start programs build a strong mental health foundation for their children, families and staff. The site houses resources for Head Start mental health consultants, staff, families, administrators and T&TA Providers.


Head Start

The Office of Head Start (OHS) promotes the school readiness of young children from low-income families through local programs. Head Start and Early Head Start programs support the mental, social, and emotional development of children from birth to age 5. Read more about our history and services, explore more information, and find a program by selecting a topic area below.



When Concerns Arise

What do you do when you have a concern about the development of your child or a child in your care? Here are some resources that provide step by step guidance in discussing the concern and where to get help.


If You’re Concerned

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides an overview for parents of what to do if they are concerned about their child’s development.


Reasons for Concern: That your child or a child in your care may need special help (PDF)

Published: 2004 | Size: 7MB
The first five years are very important in a child’s life. The sooner a child is identified, the sooner the child and family can receive specialized services to support growth and development. Parents, family members and caregivers may have concerns about a child’s development and seek help when needed. This brochure developed by the California Department of Education in collaboration with the Department of Developmental Disabilities lists reasons for concern related to risk factors, behaviors, seeing, hearing, moving, communicating and thinking that may indicate that a child may need special help.

Also available in:


Talking to Parents About Autism Kit and Video

A documentary-style, hands-on resource with examples of how to broach the topic of a potential developmental delay with parents. It contains real-life situations, strategies and success stories.


Talking with Parents When You Have Concerns About a Child in Your Care

Training PowerPoint slides for Talking with ParentsThis PowerPoint™ and accompanying article is designed to provide a framework for caregivers (anyone providing child care or out-of-school care for children) when they have concerns that a child in their care might have a developmental delay, disability, or significant behavior problem; when preparing to share concerns with a child’s parents or family members (anyone raising the child); or in understanding different ways family members will receive and act on an expressed concern.

Available translations:


Developmental Screening

Developmental screening tools like the Ages and Stages help to identify a child’s strengths and potential areas of concern. When parents and professionals complete screening tools together, it provides an opportunity to discuss the child’s development, explore ideas for activities that may enhance development, identify concerns and make a referral for evaluation and assessment. Below is information about the screening process, recommended screening tools and early identification, screening and referral projects in California counties.

American Academy of Pediatrics Early Childhood Screening

The Screening in Practices Initiative offers information and resources, including screening recommendations, practice tools, and individualized assistance, to help pediatric health care providers implement effective screening, referral, and follow-up for developmental milestones, maternal depression, and social determinants of health.


Birth to 5: Help Me Thrive – Compendium of Screening Measures for Young Children

  • Compendium of Screening Measures for Young Children (PDF)
    The Compendium of Screening Measures for Young Children is a collection of research-based screening tools for children under the age of 5. Practitioners in early care and education, primary health care, child welfare, and mental health can use this reference to learn cost, administration time, quality level, training required, and age range covered for each screening tool.
  • Developmental Screening Passport (PDF)
    The Developmental Screening Passport can be used to keep track of and share your child’s screening history and results. Download a printable version.



Developmental and Behavioral Screening Guide for Early Care and Education Providers

Developmental and Behavioral Screening Guide for Early Care and Education Providers was developed by the California Statewide Screening Collaborative and funded by the California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) Early Start and Health Services Section through its Race to the Top–Early Learning Challenge grant and produced by the WestEd Center for Prevention & Early Intervention under contract to DDS. This guide is designed to increase awareness of and access to screening, services and supports, and referral resources that are available for California’s young children and their families.The first section contains an overview and discussion of the provider’s role in screening and monitoring within the context of early care and education settings. The second section features a comprehensive list of developmental and behavioral screening resources that are available online.



First Signs

First Signs is a national non-profit organization dedicated to educating parents and professionals about the early warning signs of autism and related disorders.


MAP’s County Specific Resources

From this link click on your county and you’ll find contact information and links to websites for that have information, training and programs that may benefit a child with or without special needs. Local contact information and links to websites are available for local Early Start Family Resource Centers, First 5, Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, Early Head Start and Head Start, 2-1-1 Information Centers, and other local initatives.


Referral for Evaluation and Assessment

When developmental concerns are identified by the parents, health care provider or the results of a screening, a referral for evaluation and assessment can made by family members or service providers. When the child is under the age of 3 the referral is made to the local Regional Center. When the child is 3 or older the referral is made to the local school district, County Office of Education or Special Education Local Plan Agency. Families can contact their local Early Start Family Resource Center for information and to support them through the process. The resources below describe the process and services.

California Early Start

California Early Start provides early intervention services for infants and toddlers from birth to age 3. This site describes the services, eligibility and how to make a referral.


Early Childhood Information Sharing Tool Kit

The purpose of this Toolkit is to provide community providers with the information, tools, and resources to help families obtain developmental check-ups, receive additional services and referrals, track their child’s care, and assist community providers to coordinate and share their concerns about a child’s development with other community providers.


Family Resource Center Network of California (FRCNCA)

Email: info@frcnca.org

The FRCNCA is a coalition of California’s 47 Early Start Family Resource Centers. Staffed by families of children with special needs, family resource centers offer parent-to-parent support and help parents, families, and children locate and use needed services. They offer support services and resources in many languages, which may include newsletters, resource libraries, websites, parent-to-parent groups, sibling support groups, warmlines, and information and referral for parents and professionals.


Prevention Resource and Referral Services (PRRS)

Infants and toddlers who do not qualify for Early Start may qualify for PRRS provided by local Family Resource Centers. The Regional Center determines if a child should be referred to PRRS based on risk factors.


Referral for Evaluation and Assessment (MAP)

  • MAP’s Overview of California Early Start Training PowerPoint™
    See also Journey’s Through California Early Start PowerPoint™, which describes the referral process and services for three different children.
  • MAP’s County Specific Resources
    Regional Centers for children birth to three and County Offices of Education of SELPAs for children over 3. Click on your county and you’ll find contact information and links to the websites of the local Regional Center and County Office of Education, Special Education Local Plan Agency and Family Resource Centers.

Community Resources/Support for Families

All families can benefit from a variety of community services to support the growth of their children. Families of children who do not qualify for early intervention services can support their child’s development by continuing discussions about developmental milestones with other parents, child care and health care providers and by participating in periodic screening and opportunities for parent education. Local First 5 programs, Early Head Start, Head Start, local park and recreation programs and high quality early care and education programs may provide those opportunities. Families with children who qualify for early intervention services may also want to get involved in play groups, early care and education opportunities or other neighbor hood activities to promote inclusion and belonging in their community.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


MAP’s County Specific Resources

From this link click on your county and you’ll find contact information and links to websites for that have information, training and programs that may benefit a child with or without special needs. Local contact information and links to websites are available for local Early Start Family Resource Centers, First 5, Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, Early Head Start and Head Start, 2-1-1 Information Centers, and other local initatives.